Information Concerning the “Confirming a Release from Federally Regulated Underground Storage Tank Systems” Form

Confirming a Release from Federally Regulated Underground Storage Tank Systems

The Federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires the NJ Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to report on sources and causes of releases from Federally regulated underground storage tank (UST) systems. In order to comply with these reporting requirements, the DEP has developed procedures to gather data for each new release from a Federal UST.

All parties conducting remediation at a site with Federally regulated USTs shall complete the Federal UST Release Reporting Form and submit with any initial Remedial Investigation Report submitted to comply with N.J.A.C. 7:14B-8.3.

Applicability and Summary of Regulated Underground Storage Tanks in New Jersey

Substance Stored/
Used
Tank
Capacity *
Applicable
Law(s)
Comments/Explanations
Heating oil for sale, distribution or commercial use any amount Federal & state UST laws Fuel oil dealers, and others who sell, distribute, or use heating oil in a commercial process, must comply.
Heating oil for non-residential heating more than 2,000 gallons State UST law Facilities with aggregate UST capacities of 2,000 gallons or less are exempt from the state UST law. Heating oil tanks of any size used for residential heating are also exempt. 
Motor fuels for non-residential use or sale any amount Federal and state UST laws Includes petroleum products used in the operation of a motor: gasoline, diesel, aviation, gasohol, etc.
Motor fuels for farm or residential use more than 1,100 gallons Federal and state UST laws USTs located at a residence but used for business purposes are required to comply. Owners of farm USTs should contact the DEP at the number below for special applicability information. 
Waste oil any amount Federal and state UST laws Waste oil includes used automotive crankcase oil and other used lubricating oils. 
Hazardous wastes any amount State UST law Although they are not regulated by the federal UST law, hazardous wastes are regulated by Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (42 U.S.C. §6921). For hazardous waste classification and technical assistance, contact the DEP’s Hazardous Waste Technical Assistance unit at 609/292-8341. 
Other hazardous substances any amount Federal and state UST laws A list of hazardous substances is available by calling DEP’s Discharge Prevention Program at (609) 633-0610 or downloading Appendix A of N.J.A.C. 7:1E at http://www.nj.gov/dep/rpp/brp/dp/dpdown.htm

Definition of Terms

Sources of Federal Release

  • Tank: This term means the tank that stores the product and is part of the underground storage tank system.
  • Piping: This term means the piping and connectors running from the tank or submersible turbine pump to the dispenser or other end-use equipment. It does not include vent, vapor recovery, or fill lines.
  • Dispenser: This term includes the dispenser and equipment used to connect the dispenser to the piping. For example, a release from a suction pump or components located above the shear valve would be considered a release from the dispenser.
  • Submersible Turbine Pump (STP) Area: This term includes the submersible turbine pump head (typically located in the tank sump), the line leak detector, and the piping that connects the submersible turbine pump to the tank.
  • Spill Bucket: A product tight chamber that surrounds the fill port riser. It is designed to capture any product that may spill when disconnecting the delivery truck hose from the UST fill port riser.
  • Vapor Recovery System: Any component of the tank system designed to recover gasoline vapors generated when filling a vehicle’s fuel tank (stage II vapor recovery). This system, depending on design, can include associated hoses, piping and/or drop tank.
  • Vent Pipe: A pipe that lets air enter an UST when product is dispensed.
  • Fill Port/Fill Lines: The end of the drop tube at ground surface where product is introduced to an UST. This includes remote fill ports and associated piping connected to the UST.
  • Delivery Problem: This term identifies releases that occurred during product delivery to the tank. Typical causes associated with this source are spills and overfills.
  • Other: Use this option when the release source does not fit into one of the above categories. For example, releases from vent lines, vapor recovery lines, and fill lines would be included in this category.

Cause of Federal Release

  • Spill: Use this cause when a spill occurs. For example, spills may occur when the delivery hose is disconnected from the fill pipe of the tank or when the nozzle is removed from the vehicle at the dispenser.
  • Overfill: Use this cause when an overfill occurs. For example, overfills may occur from the fill pipe at the tank or when the nozzle fails to shut off at the dispenser.
  • Physical or Mechanical Damage (Phys/Mech Damage): Use this cause for all types of physical or mechanical damage except corrosion as described below. Some examples of physical or mechanical damage include: a puncture of the tank or piping, loose fittings, broken components, and components that have changed dimension (for example, elongation or swelling).
  • Corrosion: Use this cause when a metal tank, piping, or other component has a release due to corrosion (for steel, corrosion takes the form of rust). This is a specific type of physical or mechanical damage.
  • Installation Problem: Use this cause
  • Other: Use this option when the cause is known, but does not fit into one of the above categories. For example, accidentally or intentionally putting regulated substances into a monitor well would be included in this category.
  • Unknown: Use this option only when the cause is not know
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